Datingsite for intelligent people

We also asked online daters what drove them to join the super-tailored sites and whether they have found love in the digital world.Intellectual Passions Intellectual Passions is a free dating site for intellectual singles.The Right Stuff requires its members to provide proof of graduate or faculty status before joining." 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY Information provided on this website is believed to be accurate; however A Greater Date does not guarantee it's accuracy.

Aptly named to imply a superior caste of digital daters, The League relies on a screening algorithm that promises to keep its community "well-balanced and high-quality," so perhaps the negative press was somewhat understandable.

From my observations, the following dating challenges seem to be common to most smart people. So whether you went (or should have gone) to the likes of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford, Columbia, Cornell, Swarthmore, Amherst, Dartmouth, Brown, Oxford, Cambridge, Berkeley, Penn, Caltech, Duke, read on: 1. Time spent studying, doing homework, and practicing the violin is time not spent doing other things -- like chasing boys or girls, which turns out is fairly instrumental in making you a well-rounded human.

In fact, the smarter you are, the more clueless you will be, and the more problems you're going to have in your dating life. Smart people spent more time on achievements than on relationships when growing up. And smart families are usually achievement-oriented. The upshot of all that achievement is that you get into a top college -- congratulations!

But beneath The League's veneer of exclusivity, there's a clever, problem-solving interface that seals it: The app's strength is its function, not its flash. Here, why you should have it on your radar:#1: The privacy thing.

It's easy, too easy, to count the reasons why any woman who wants to "date intelligently," as their tagline goes, would love the app, which—while it rolls out today in San Francisco only—will spring up in major U. Bradford, a former Google employee who holds an MBA from Stanford, snagged on something when she suddenly became single in grad school: She wanted to join Tinder and Ok Cupid, but she didn't want everyone (her professors, her potential future employers, her ex boyfriend's friends) seeing her personal information and that she was "on the prowl." But how could she put herself out there without overexposing herself in the process?

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