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He attended American schools, wears chic professional clothes, sips coffee at Starbucks, and speaks perfect English, with little indication that until 1991 he lived in Uzbekistan.

At 29, Abayev still lives with his parents in Fresh Meadows, Queens, because in the culture of the Bukharian Jews, whose traditions developed in Central Asia, adults leave home only to begin their own families.

This natural increase, about 40 percent in eleven years, is to be explained by normalization in the composition of the procreative age group and a general improvement in socioeconomic conditions.

By the end of the 1960s there were also about 8,000 Central Asian Jews living in Israel (Tājer, pt. 105) and perhaps 1,000 (primarily emigrants from Palestine/Israel and their descendants) in other countries, mainly the United States and to a much lesser extent Canada, France, Venezuela, Argen­tina, and South Africa (in descending order). 85) contains an apparently reliable list of Jewish pilgrims to Jerusalem on Pentecost in the year 33 in sequence according to their native tongues (2:9-11), beginning with the group from farthest east, the “Par­thians.” The Medes and the Elamites are clearly distin­guished, though both groups also came from the Arsacid empire.

The term Bukharan was coined by European travelers who visited Central Asia around the 16th century.

Since most of the Jewish community at the time lived under the Emirate of Bukhara, they came to be known as Bukharan Jews.

Despite the difficulties of living at home, he believes moving out is inappropriate. "You stay with your parents until you get married, then you move not far away.

"But before he can do either, Abayev must find a Bukharian Jewish woman who meets his parents" approval.

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You won't have bachsh on Friday night," referring to a traditional Bukharian dish.

Members of the group call themselves [Y]Isroʾel (refined style) or Yahūdī (official/neutral style); the latter term was also applied to them in official Persian (Tajik) and Chagha­tay (Ùaḡatāy, Uzbek) terminology before the Russian conquest of Central Asia. There are no reliable statistics on Jews in Central Asia before the 19th century. In 1926, according to the Soviet census, the number of Central Asian Jews in the USSR was 18,698 (Lorimer, p. The first Soviet census after World War II, conducted in 1959, listed 25,990 Central Asian Jews who were native speakers of Tajik (, p. At a cau­tious estimate, about 10 percent of Central Asian Jews who abandoned the Jewish dialect of Tajik in favor of Russian (or Uzbek in a very few instances) must be added to this figure, bringing the estimate of all Central Asian Jews within the borders of the USSR to between 28,000 and 29,000.

Despite a ban since the mid­-1920s, a pejorative derivative (member of a national [ethnic] minority). In 1832 an Anglican missionary of Jewish origin, J. 55, table 23), of whom 18,172 were dwelling in the Uzbek SSR (including Tajikistan; Amitin-Shapiro, 1933, pp. They were already outnumbered even there, however, by Ashkenazis (Jews of European origin, 19,611; ibid., p. Samarkand, with 7,740 Central Asian Jews, was the largest center of concentration (ibid., p. The low natural increase between 19 is to be explained by emigration begin­ning in the late 1920s and by a long-term lowering of the birthrate caused by the Great Terror and World War II (see below), when males of procreative age were sep­arated from women and many of them were killed.

Uzbekistan's economy deteriorated, leaving few opportunities for its citizens.

The story of this community is one of a struggle to maintain its unique identity while confronting the economic and cultural pressures of the United States.

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